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Archive for November, 2011

As of November 2011, this is the most current and comprehensive information that I have found on host trees for Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB).  It’s created by Alan Sawyer, USDA-APHIS-PPQ, Otis Plant Protection Laboratory, Revised Feb , 2010
Click on Genus for more information (link will open in new browser window)

Category1 Genus2 Common Name Host Abundance 
and other notes3
Treated Surveyed4

Very good hosts

Acer Maple, boxelder Very common trees. Many US records, all species: Norway, red, silver, sugar, sycamore maple and boxelder especially favored; Amur maple less favored; Japanese maple seldom attacked. Yes
Aesculus Horsechestnut, buckeye Fairly common trees. Several US records, some heavily infested. Yes
Salix Willow Fairly common trees. Several US records: weeping, pussy and white willows highly favored; black willow (oviposition only) less favored. Yes
Ulmus Elm Very common trees. Many US records: American, Siberian and Chinese elms. Elms are apparently less preferred than maple. Yes

Good hosts

Betula Birch Fairly common trees. Several US records: gray, European white and river birches. Some gray birches with many exits. Birches are apparently less preferred than maple. Yes
Plane tree, sycamore
Common
Yes

Occasional hosts

Alizia Mimosa, silk tree Occasional ornamental. Exit holes: 2 records from field in NY with additional emergence in laboratory. No Chinese record Yes
Katsura tree,
C. japonicum
Occasional ornamental. Four records from Worcester, MA,including 2 trees with exit holes
Yes
Celtis HackberryCeltis occidentalis Fairly common tree. Oviposition: 1 unverified record from IL, with small/medium-sized larva identified as ALB. No Chinese record. Yes
Fraxinus

Ash

(especially green
ash, Fraxinus pennsylvanica)

Very common tree, but injury infrequent relative to host abundance. Several US records, all from IL, most of these unverified (but at least two exit holes confirmed). Host in Chinese literature. Exit hole in green ash in Chinese field test. Yes
Populus Poplar(excluding cottonwood) Fairly common trees. Diverse group. Suitability apparently varies; some species and hybrids are prime hosts in China. Just 7 US records (NY, NJ), including balsam popular, P. balsamifera,
Balm-of-Gilead (a hybrid cultivar), eastern cottonwood, P. deltoides, quaking aspen, P. tremuloides and unidentified Populus sp. Exit hole on quaking aspen, adults reared in lab from
field-collected cottonwood.
Yes
Sorbus Mountain-ash Occasional ornamental. Exit hole: 1 record from field in IL with additional emergence in laboratory. No Chinese record. Note: this is not a true ash; Sorbus is a member of the rose family. Yes

Questionable hosts

Hibiscus Rose-of-Sharon, H. syriacus Common ornamental shrub. Exit: 1 unverified report, NY; Oviposition: several records, NY, but no larval development, possibly incidental to heavy damage on nearby hosts. No
Chinese record.
No
Malus Apple, crab apple Common ornamental. Oviposition: 1 uestionable record, IL Host in Chinese literature. Oviposition observed in China. No
Morus Mulberry Very common tree. Oviposition: 1 record, NY. No Chinese record. No
Prunus Cherry, plum Very common ornamental. Oviposition: 2 records, NY & IL, but
no survival. Host in Chinese literature.
No
Pyrus Pear Common ornamental. Exit: 1 questionable record, IL. Host in Chinese literature. No
Quercus Oak Very common tree. Oviposition: 1 record, NY (incidental to heavy damage on nearby hosts). No Chinese record. No
Robinia Black Locust Common tree. Exit: 2 doubtful records, IL. Host in Chinese literature. Egg sites observed in China. No
Tilia Linden, Basswood Common tree. Oviposition: 2 records (IL & NY) but no survival. Host in Chinese literature. No

No U.S. Record5

Alnus Alder Locally common tree or shrub. No US record. Host in Chinese literature. Exit hole observed in gray alder, A. incana, in cage study in China. No
Silverberry, Russian Olive
Widely-planted ornamental shrub. No US cord. Host in Chinese literature; Heavy feeding damage and exit hole observed in China.
No
Goldenraintree, K. paniculata
Occasional ornamental. No US record. Heavy feeding,
oviposition sites and 2 exit holes observed in cage study in China.
No
Melia Chinaberry
Uncommon shrub. No US record; reported not to be a host in Chinese literature but damage observed.
No
Reported not to be hosts Ailanthus Tree of heaven Common tree. No US record; reported not to be a host in Chinese literature. No

1 Host status based on US records of infestation, field studies with North American trees planted in China and Chinese literature. Host range tests in laboratory and greenhouse settings not considered except as noted. See Hu et al. (2009) for a review of hosts with particular emphasis on the status of poplars in China.

Host genera listed alphabetically within catagories.

Host abundance based on program records , general oversvations of infested areas in NY and IL, and on Nowack, D.J., 1994. “Urban Forest Structure: the State of Chicago’s Urban Forest.” pp 3-18 In: E.G. McPherson et al., Chicago’s Urban Forest Ecosystem: Results of the Chicago Forest Climate Project. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-186, USDA Forest Service, Northeast Forest Experiment Sta., Radnor, PA.

4 Included in surveys and chemical treatments by USDA Cooperative ALB Eradication Program in IL, NY and NJ.

Trees with no US record are reported to be hosts in china but have not been attacked in the US at this point References Hu, J., S. Angeli, S. Schuetz, Y. Luo and A. E. Hajek. 2009. Ecology and management of exotic and endemic Asian longhorned beetle Anoplophora glabripennis. Agric. For. Entomol. 11: 359-375. Nowack, D. J., 1994, “Urban Forest Structure: The State of Chicago’s Urban Forest,” pp. 3-18 In: E. G. McPherson et al., Chicago’s Urban Forest Ecosystem: Results of the Chicago Urban Forest Climate Project. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-186, USDA Forest Service, NE Forest Experiment Sta., Radnor, PA

Source: University of Vermont

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